Irrational Moralising

“In a sample of 1,015 adult Americans, only 29.5 percent of respondents agreed that nanotechnology was morally acceptable” compared with 54% in the UK and 72% in France. This was put down to “religion” by Dietram Scheufele, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (For anyone unaware, Dietram also has an excellent blog discussing issues of public trust called Nanopublic. ) The …

Here Comes The Green Goo

I woke up to Radio 4 this morning to hear Jim Thomas of the ETC Group calling for a moratorium on something or other – this time it’s synthetic biology which the ETC group view as some kind of biological pollution although in a subsequent interviewcasino mirar sus oponentes h?bitos. with Craig Ventner ETC were described as “not having much …

Hippies Ban Chemicals – Nanotech Industry Flustered

Back to the Future? In the silliest story of the year so far, the Soil Association, a UK organisation which provides a certification process for organic food, has announced that products will not be certified as organic if they contain additives “made by the burgeoning nanotechnology industry” according to the Financial Times. I’m sure that I won’t be the only …

European Innovation Blues

A rather depressingly long list of reasons for Europe’s failure to commercialise nanotechnology appears in a Cordis report on the latest EuroNanoForum. technological issues (this is still a very new field of research) regulations, or uncertainty as to whether a new regulation is imminent unease among the general public a lack of skilled personnel insufficient intellectual property protection hesitation from …

The Future Is … A Nice Cup of Tea?

A new study by the Nanotechnology Industry Association (UK) titled a “Forecast of Emerging Technologies (Nanotechnologies)” has just been released, which concludes that, erm, well we are not quite sure, although it does contain some of the longest sentences we have seen for a while. The concluding diagram, which represents “colour-coded examples of the five major categories of time-dependent nanotechnological …

Wholesome Degeneracy Through Nanotech

A common argument of futurists is that many of the predictions, such as the Astronomer Royal calling the prospect of space travel “utter bilge” in 1956 show how wrong people can be. An issue of Time Magazine from 1966 popped up on my radar earlier this year just illustrates how completely wrong most predictions can be, and how close others …

Transhumanist Law

I’m not sure what it is about the MNT community, but any perceived heresy must be responded to with bile and venom.  There’s nothing wrong with a good debate, but some of the comments on the IEEE blog seem rather over the top. This post at the Foresight blog made me wonder whether the transhumanist fundamentalists were planning a utopian …